Home

 

For a quiet and friendly place to fish on the Thames

 

Contact ...

 

Chairman: Paul Stevens

Email: paul@south-stoke-angling-club.co.uk

Tel: 07917 863289

 

... for further details

WELCOME TO SOUTH STOKE ANGLING'S WEBSITE.

 

THIS WEBSITE WILL NOW FEATURE BASIC CLUB INFORMATION, CLUB HISTORY AND AN ANNUAL FIXTURE LIST - MORE RECENT NEWS (INCLUDING RESULTS) AND THE OPPORTUNITY TO INTERACT WILL BE CONTAINED ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE @

 

SOUTH STOKE ANGLING

(members only)

 

MEMBERSHIP NOW READY FOR THE

COMING SEASON

£20 pp

Come and enjoy our stunning views and excellent location.

 

Match fixtures will appear here shortly.

Welcome to South Stoke Angling's website - first published on 9th December 2014 and expanded to its current format in February 2015 as the club approached the end of its first season after its 'rebirth' in early 2014 (see Chairmans letter - December 2014 'Phoenix from the ashes' - for more information).

Club History - can you help ?

 

A fishing club has previously been very much part of the activities and history of South Stoke, so we have started a 'history page' within 'about us' on the site.

 

Do you have any photographs, memorabilia or stories that will help us expand this ?

 

A number of people have commented on this page, but I have now run out of material to upload (thanks to Paul and Chris Cade for contributions to date), but would like to continue to expand it further - so please send any contributions in soft copy to:

webmaster@south-stoke-angling-club.co.uk

or pass hard copy documents to Paul (they will be handled carefully and returned to you undamaged).

An archive of NEWS ITEMS from 21st December 2014 - 5th July 2015 are now removed from this slot and preserved on our archives page

This photograph by Paul, on the last day of 2014, shows what we are here to protect in 2015 (and hopefully for many years beyond)

About South Stoke

 

South Stoke is a village and civil parish on an east bank of the Thames, about 1.5 miles north of Goring-on-Thames in South Oxfordshire. It includes less than 1 mile to its north the hamlet and manor house of Littlestoke. Wikipedia

 

South Stoke is a delightful village sandwiched between the River Thames and the main railway line from Paddington to Oxford and the south-west. Access to the village from the Goring to Crowmarsh road is by way of one of three arched bridges, whilst a fourth way through the railway embankment, known locally as the Bogey Hole, enables a footpath to the hamlet of Little Stoke. Oxfordshire Villages

 

Our beginnings are in the mists of time. A riverside village with agricultural roots. South Stoke is mentioned in The Doomsday book. Our claim to fame were our eels at which Remigius, the then Bishop of Dorchester declared we were” to be put into the Dorchester 100, for ever and a day”. South Stoke Parish Council - Local History

 

Although in Dorchester hundred, South Stoke formed an enclave in Langtree hundred in the south of the county. Like so many of the Chiltern parishes South Stoke is long and narrow, stretching from its short river frontage on the Thames up into the hill land round its hamlet at Woodcote. The ancient parish covers 3,370 acres and is about 5 miles long and a mile wide, except in the south-east corner, where it is as little as half a mile across. British History Online

 

In 1870-72, John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales described South Stoke like this: A Vision of Britain Through Time.

 

South Stoke, St Andrew's Church, Oxfordshire ... A large church in a pretty village on the east bank of the River Thames, St Andrew's dates to the early 13th century, though there was almost certainly a much earlier church on this spot. The parish is thought to have been founded in Saxon period by St Birinus, but the earliest part of the church we see today are a pair of lancets in the south aisle and north wall. Fragments of medieval glass are gathered in the south aisle window. Britain Express

 

The village of South Stoke, about 12 miles west of Henley, is unusual in that three highways, which have done much to influence its history and people, pass through it. Two of these highways are ancient, the river Thames and the Ridgeway path, while the third is the Great Western Railway built by Isambard Brunel. These three routes converge as they cross the parish boundaries near Ye Olde Leatherne Bottle public house (now Rossini at The Leatherne Bottel) to the south and at the Moulsford railway bridge, known locally as the Four Arches, to the north. Visitor UK